The aristocracy of style

This is truly a Holy Land: Israel hosts it’s second Fashion Week in one month. Gindi TLV FW hosted the country’s most acknowledged designers, welcomed reviewers, bloggers and buyers from all over the world, and of course local and international celebrities – even Bar Refaeli hit the runway.

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The second TLV FW is actually a smart collaboration of advertising a new business even before it’s opened, and creating some buzz around Israeli fashion. Organizer Motty Reif teamed up with Isreal’s soon-to-be greatest shopping temple, Gindi Fashion Mall, opening in 2014. The luxurious venue was built right above the construction sight of the mall, combining decadent elegance with industrial charm, where gigantic disco balls are hanging from cranes. The red carpet was filled with young and brave fashionistas. I got to admit, I’m no expert in recognizing local celebs yet, but I did spot nightlife diva and drag princess, Kay Long… how typical of me. The 30 meters long runway – on of the largest I’ve ever seen, and trust me, I’ve seen some – aligned collections by Dorit Bar Or, Yosef, Alon Livne, Sasson Kedem, Dany Mizrachi, and many more designers, and hosted the superstar-catwalks of Bar Refaeli, Esti Ginzburg, Noa Tishby, and even Eurovision sensation Dana International. All in all: the event was meant to impress.

The first show I decided to visit was Sasson Kedem’s. Mostly because I heard locals refer to his dresses as “the Tilda Swinton clothes”, and also because I just had a good feeling about the guy. I saw him walking by at the previous Fashion Week, dressed as some sort of a stylish samurai. I always had a weakness for the clothes which are not just fabulous looking, but are also comfortable as if I’d wear my pajamas. The new collection was a bright and optimistic celebration of unity: models from every shape, age and race presented the oriami-like dresses. The ruling color was bright white and deep-deep black, and the season’s patters at Kedem’s are Minnie Mouse-like dots. His ars poetica, “My imagination goes wild when I start out creating each design, Turning a blank canvas into three dimensional wearable arts” is clearly visible on every single peace he creates.


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The main difference between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv is that when you say the name ‘Yosef” in the Holy City, everyone will think about a guy with a colorful coat from the Bible. But in the White City this name means the absolute king of Israeli fashion, Yosef – and instead of coats of many colors we think about fabulous garments. The guy is not simply a tremendously talented professional, but also a charming personality, and this killer combination keeps his fashion house rocking since 2000, when he presented his first collection. Since then he was collaborating with worldwide brands like Pepsi and Fiat, and opened a flagship store and a studio in Tel Aviv and Jaffa. The 2013 collection is playful, courageous and extremely beautiful. It brings together the future with history: Aztec prints meet solid beige colors and flickering silver textiles, heavy lines and floating frills can exist in perfect harmony, and there is place for baggy big boy pants, and sophisticated evening dresses is well.

After the show I had the chance to meet Yosef and tell him how terrific the show was. His eyes were full of sparks and he looked happy as a child on Christmas morning. “We’ve been working on this for so many months!” he told me with great relief in his voice. “And after only twenty minutes on the catwalk it’s over. Isn’t it crazy?” I asked him, and we laughed. But of course the real show is just about to get started: the collection is up for grabs, and something tells me that the international breakthrough for Yosef is just around the corner.

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Browse Yosef’s collections and shop online here. Follow me on Facebook for daily updates!

Photos by White City Boy and/or Gindi Fashion Week’s official Facebook site.

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